Lawn Service Company Palm Beach Co | 561-307-9411 | Jupiter Lawn Care West Palm Beach

Lawn Service Company Palm Beach Co | 561-307-9411 | Jupiter Lawn Care West Palm Beach

visit our website: http://Broedelllandscaping.com Call: 561-307-9411 Lawn Maintenance Jupiter – West Palm Beach – Boca Raton Florida

 

Broedell Landscape is a full service landscaping company located in Palm Beach County, Florida.

 

Palm Beach County’s Reliable Lawn Maintenance Company

 

If you have yard, you probably want it to look good. Regular lawn maintenance is not an easy task. Landscaping requires hard work in the Florida heat and has to be done consistently. The endless need to keep your grass healthy and maintained can be challenging for busy schedules, definitely for homeowners who have a family and work full time jobs. If your agenda is full or if you just don’t feel like mowing your yard every week in the West Palm Beach heat, you’re going to want lawn cutting services to help. Broedell Landscape is a residential and commercial grass cutting services in Palm Beach. We take pride in the care of your yard and ensure it always looks great so you don’t have to.

 

Why Choose Broedell Landscape?

 

We have serviced the Palm Beach County FL area for 15 years and we have completed hundreds of highly rated commercial landscaping credential and residential landscape services, producing satisfied customers with positive reviews from Jupiter, west palm beach FL, and Boca Raton FL who continue to choose us for their lawn care needs. We can execute any kind of lawn service you may need. Our team offers reliable, cost effective services. We understand everyone’s lawn is different, and we will adapt to execute your specific tree cutting requirements. No Project is too big or too small.

 

The Best Lawn Mowing credentials

 

There are a lot of companies that offer landscaping service in the Palm Beach area. You might have hired one in the past and not been happy with the results. We offer a total lawn cleaning that takes care of your front and backyard with the most affordable pricing. We will adapt to your needs and make sure to have your yard looking the way you want it to. Many of our packages automatically send our team to your home or business on the right schedule; there’s no need to remind us! Ask for a free quote. Hire us for garden services worth bragging about, you’ll want to give us your best verified reviews with five stars!

 

Certified Professional Lawn Cutting Pros

 

During the hot West Palm Beach summers, lawns can be cut on a weekly schedule. Every job will be inspected on location for loose debris before we bsing moving and we always make sure we don’t damage valuable sprinkler heads. No lawn care job is complete without blowing any green clippings from sidewalks and driveways back into the grassy areas. Any sidewalks, tree lines, fence lines, beach walls, ocean walls, and bordered sections not accessible to mowers will be trimmed every week giving your property a well maintained look.

 

Rain Days

 

If the weather conditions prevent us from performing lawn care services on the date, we will reschedule your lawn mowing service as soon as the weather is under control.

 

Broedell Landscape is the #1 option for you with free estimates, affordable prices along with quality work, on time, and on budget. Our Landscaping business has over 15 years of expertise in the tree care business and is fully insured and is known for first class staff and safe work ethics. As a business that has been serving the Palm Beaches for several years, our longevity is a testament to our commitment to quality craftsmanship, customer service, and low costs.

 

 

 

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More information about Landscaping and Lawn Care Services visit: http://www.scotts.com/smg/gosite/Scotts-v2/MyLawn

 

Broedell Landscaping

 

Lawn Service Company Palm Beach Co | 561-307-9411 | Jupiter Lawn Care West Palm Beach

Get Over Your AdWords Performance Plateau with These Strategies

When you’re launching a new AdWords account or getting your hands dirty optimizing an existing account, the world is full of possibilities. You implement all your ideas, do heaps of testing and are left with fairly mature campaigns…

… and that’s when the real challenges spring up.

Walking the GR20 in Corsica
Once you’ve scaled the mountain that is correctly configuring your AdWords account, you realize you’re only halfway to the top… Image source.

As a seasoned AdWords marketer, you find yourself yearning for more volume, better CPAs and higher click-through rates.

In this post I want to cover some of the advanced levers and switches you can employ at the more mature stages of your account. For each of the problems above, we’ll look at super-specific tactics and advanced AdWords functionalities that you can use to solve for X.

Let’s dig in.

I want more volume

There comes a time when AdWords has proven a successful advertising channel for your business and your CPA is profitable.

You’ve expanded your keyword list as far as it will logically stretch, you have ad groups covering every possible topic that has been shown to convert customers, and you still can’t seem to get as much traffic as you can eat.

Let me remind you that there’s a subtle campaign setting you can try out: accelerated ad serving.

accelerated-ad-serving-1
 
accelerated-ad-serving-2
Where you can change your delivery method in your AdWords account.

By default, Google tempers your campaigns so that your entire budget doesn’t get spent at 12:01am when the new day begins. They balance your impressions so if you enter a $100/day budget, that $100 gets distributed somewhat evenly throughout the hours of the day.

But when you switch on accelerated ad serving, you’re telling Google to throw caution to the wind and show your ad for every possible relevant impression.

Perhaps you’re thinking, “Isn’t it best to spread impressions throughout the day? Why would I want Google to rapid-fire my ad in this way?”

If your budget is tight, yes, it’s often best to show ads evenly over time. But if what you’re after is the maximum number of impressions that could reasonably yield a conversion, and you set your campaign budgets high enough, accelerated ad serving will get you in front of prospects that would not otherwise see your ad due to “even delivery” or load balancing.

You can learn more about this ad delivery method here.

Pro tip: Be ready to raise budget caps if you go with accelerated ad serving. You don’t want to let Google spend all your budget between midnight at 8am, leaving you out to dry during other peak traffic times that might otherwise be ripe with conversions for you.

I want better cost per acquisition

Most people manage cost per acquisition (CPA) by campaign, keyword and ad group, adjusting bids at those levels.

But there are other factors and dimensions by which you may want to change your bids on the fly.

If you only adjust bids at the ad group and keyword level, you’re basically prioritizing specific search topics rather than information about the searcher. Sometimes, indicators like how they choose to visit your site and where they’re visiting from can be even better indicators of a potential customer than the keyword searched.

For that reason, it’s equally important to look at performance by device and by geography. Take your account to the next level by starting to make mobile/desktop/tablet bid adjustments and geo bid adjustments.

Bid adjustments by device

If you’re running mobile-specific campaigns, then you should be making use of this feature. Here’s the screen where you can make bid adjustments by device:

big-adjustments-by-device
Click for larger image.

As a bonus, you can also learn some things about your visitors’ experience of your site through this feature.

If certain mobile devices or tablets are doing particularly poorly, try opening an incognito browser window and accessing the site from the device in question (this’ll “wipe the slate clean” and remove the possibility that browser cookies you’ve collected will influence how you see the site). You might be surprised by what you discover.

At a former workplace of mine, we used to assume that if a single employee saw a bug or broken experience in a given environment, 100 visitors have experienced the same freak issue. In the case of search ads, this type of usability issue can really hurt conversions.

Of course, you can and should run proper usability testing on your app or site to discover problems of this type — but device bid adjustments can be a handy place to learn about potential issues.

Bid adjustments by geography

Some products and services convert differently in disparate geographies. If you’re selling raincoats, to use a simple example, you will do better in wet climates like Seattle and Portland than in areas that see less rainfall.

Here’s how you adjust bids by geography/by state, using the checkboxes to modify bids for a given geo:

bid-adjustments-by-geography
Click for larger image.

Google reps I’ve talked to tend to suggest adjustments in the 15% range. This is a big enough percentage change to impact the auction and review results, but conservative enough to avoid throwing CPA out-of-whack by much if it doesn’t succeed.

If a device or geo is under-performing, they suggest cutting the bid by 15%, or maybe 10% if it’s doing just slightly worse than desired.

See more info on bid adjustments.

I want better click-through rates

When an AdWords account is sufficiently mature, it becomes harder to figure out ways to take up additional real estate in the search results and really make a splash.

The character requirements of AdWords ads are stingy, with just 95 total characters to differentiate your product or service from the many competitors showing up beside your ad.

Ad extensions offer several ways to get more bang for your buck. Let’s look into three extensions that will help you amp up your ads with:

  • Beefed-up benefits statements
  • Links to relevant areas of your website
  • Additional ways for customers to contact you

1. Callout extensions

The more real estate your ad covers in Google search results, the more dominant your company appears beside the competition.

Callout extensions are extra text snippets that you can use to add callout text beneath your ad when it shows up in the top three slots in paid search results.

They show up in gray beneath your ad and they’re typically used to speak to a few key benefits of your product or service. Businesses will often use this feature to talk about things like free shipping, price matching, 24/7 support or impressive ratings and reviews.

For example, in the ad below, the advertiser has chosen to focus on free shipping, 24-7 customer service and price matching.

acme-electronics-ad
The final line of text in this ad shows what callout extensions look like.

Not everything fits in those two tidy description lines, so take advantage of this additional real estate.

You can learn more about callout extensions here.

2. Sitelink extensions

Although your ad headline should generally point to a dedicated landing page for the keyword in question, there are often peripheral pages on your site that might be of interest customers. Sitelink extensions enable advertisers to link to specific topic areas on their website.

These can range from “About us” to “Our guarantee” to “How to save 15%” and similar offers.

Here’s what sitelink extensions look like:

walters-bakery-for-dog-adwords-ad
 

In the example above, sitelinks help solve the problem of a searcher who isn’t looking for a landing page to convince her that Walter’s dog bakery is awesome. Instead, she may be looking for the bakery’s hours or the specific types of biscuits available.

You may want to add sitelinks to link to pages or secondary calls to action:

  • About us
  • Discounts or special offers
  • Our team
  • Our guarantee

You can also enter descriptions for each sitelink, which appear like this:

example-tshirt-store-adwords-ad
 

If you feel an aversion to increasing the number of links you’re serving in your ad, consider this case study, where sitelinks increased CTR by 64%.

These may not be for everyone, but the only way to find out if this will be an effective feature for you is to test.

Pro tip: Get creative with sitelinks! Google lets you test a slew of them at once, and you can view reports that break down how each performed from a click-through and conversion perspective.

3. Call extensions

If your company encourages phone calls to sales or customer service departments, you can also take advantage of call extensions.

Why? Because they work. In this case study, adding a call extension increased mobile leads by 110%.

What’s more, some businesses find that phone calls convert better than online inquiries. Because it takes more motivation to pick up the phone and speak to a human than it does to fill out a form, leads are often more motivated.

Here’s what a call extension looks like (though it’ll vary depending on the device you’re using):

buscot-travel-agency-adwords-ad
 
geico-insurance-quotes-adwords-ad
 

If you run this type of extension, consider tracking calls via unique phone numbers.

This can help prove out the ROI of using AdWords to drive phone calls, can help determine which advertising channel drives the most calls, and can even let you distinguish between calls from the ad extension text itself (like the GEICO ad above) and prospects who clicked through and landed on the website before dialling in.

Depending on the relevance of inbound calls to your business, you might want to learn more about advanced call analytics.

Never be satisfied

With PPC (and more broadly speaking, with conversion rate optimization), the goal isn’t to achieve a “good” conversion rate. It’s to keep getting better through testing new features and new hypotheses.

Once you’ve got your AdWords account set up and you fancy yourself a more seasoned AdWords marketer, you should never settle.

Keep reading new blog posts. Keep testing new features. Because the only good AdWords performance metrics are those that are constantly improving.


Get Over Your AdWords Performance Plateau with These Strategies

Growth Lessons from Twitter, HubSpot, PayPal and PlentyOfFish

Some call it – *cough* – growth hacking. Others call it optimization. But what we’re all talking about, really, is crazy smart, innovative, results-driven, product-focused marketing that has an outsized impact on your company’s growth and bottom line.

1379943011_598292216
Amirite?

In certain circles, the term of art is traction. Traction is what separates fledgling startups from international brands and it’s the name of a one-day, one-track event that brought dozens of founders and growth champions from tech giants like Twitter, LinkedIn, Dropbox, Hootsuite, Marketo, HubSpot and PlentyofFish to Vancouver last month.

The day was filled with actionable insights and examples of how small tests, tweaks and tactics can make or break your business. Here are some of our key takeaways.

Product comes first

In many companies, product and marketing are viewed and operated as distinct departments. But one of the prevalent themes of the day was that your product is actually your most important marketing asset.

Indeed, Markus Frind, founder and CEO of dating site PlentyofFish made the crowd gasp when he said that by the time he hired his first employee (and started to build out his marketing team), he already had a hit product with 15 million users and $10 million in revenue!

Neil Patel, co-founder of KissMetrics and CrazyEgg, pointed out that conversion optimization is actually a lot like dating; you need to give people a chance to get to know you before you ask for their hand in marriage. He suggested letting potential customers play around with your product before they have to sign up.

Selina Tobaccowala, President & CTO of SurveyMonkey, said something similar:

The more you can get people using features of the product before they have to upgrade, the better for conversions.

But Tobaccowala also cautioned against pulling the old bait and switch. If you put a paid feature in people’s hands, let them know the price tag before they spend time with something they can’t afford.

Ryan Holmes, the founder and CEO of social relationship platform Hootsuite, insisted that the only reason Hootsuite outlasted or surpassed early competitors like Seesmic and TweetDeck is that it invested in product rather than advertising and PR.

Now that they’re the industry leader, HootSuite has built its marketing around the product – and the role it plays in people’s lives. Here’s how Holmes sees his role:

As CEO or founder your job is tell the story of your product and get people excited about it.

Find the metric that matters

If there’s anything that distinguishes growth-minded marketers it’s a steadfast belief in the power of numbers. As Aaron Ginn, Head of Growth at online retailer Everlane (and formerly of StumbleUpon) put it, a growth hacker is:

Someone who emphasizes data over opinions.

We know that data is big these days (especially “big data”) but that’s precisely the problem: Data is big. There’s a ton of it. And it can be intimidating and unwieldy.

That’s why, before staring into the abyss of analytics, you need to identify the metrics that really matter to your business.

Dinesh Thiru, VP Marketing at online education marketplace Udemy, said that his two main metrics are revenue and student happiness. While user growth is also important, Udemy learned that you have to look at both the quantity and quality of users you’re acquiring. Some users “monetize better than others” and so focusing on actual purchases helps keep Udemy honest.

In terms of tracking student happiness, Thiru said he looks at Udemy’s Net Promoter Score (NPS), which measures how likely users are to recommend the company to friends or colleagues. Interestingly, Thiru found that users who reported a higher NPS also had a higher lifetime value. In this way, Udemy’s two key metrics reinforce each other nicely.


.@Udemy discovered that their most valuable customers were also their happiest ones.

 

Click To Tweet

 


Allen Lau, the founder and CEO of online writing community Wattpad, said that at his company’s primary metric is monthly active users. This is something Wattpad’s investors insisted the company focus on instead of making money. That said, more recently Wattpad has begun to zero in on advertising as its core business model and so the monthly users metrics now seems less like a vanity metric and more revenue-oriented after all.

Retention is not an afterthought

If you have poor retention, nothing else matters.

That’s a quote from Brian Balfour, VP Growth at HubSpot. It may seem dramatic, but we’ve all heard the adage that it’s easier to market to existing customers than new ones and without retention, traction just isn’t possible.

Balfour enumerated a few reasons retention is so important:

  • As you increase retention, you increase lifetime value and can afford a higher cost per acquisition (CPA) – allowing you to spend more at the top of the funnel
  • As you increase retention, you increase virality (your longtime customers become advocates on your behalf) and eventually decrease CPA
  • As you increase retention, you increase upgrade rates and decrease payback periods (meaning more money in the bank)

The key to retention in the first week after sign-up, according to Balfour, is to get users to experience your core value as quickly as possible through better onboarding, clearer messaging and tailoring the user experience to new customers.

improving-31-retention
 

For example, HubSpot was looking to increase adoption of its new email tool, Sidekick. The first step was to understand why users were churning in the first week. A majority of people reported that they just didn’t understand the product or have time to figure it out.

some-of-our-findings
 

By separating the new user experience from the core application, encouraging users to sign up with their work email addresses (where they were more likely to see the product’s value) and improving their educational content, they were able to significantly reduce churn.

It takes a community

Retention, of course, isn’t just about great user experience or clever email marketing. The key to keeping your customers for the long haul is to empower them to become more than customers.

Here’s the recipe for sustainable growth that Phil Fernandez, Marketo’s CEO, shared:

  1. Acquire new customers
  2. Grow lifetime value
  3. Build brand advocates
fundamental-recipe-for-growth
 

Fernandez said businesses need to think about how they’re creating a “shared purpose” with everyone in their “ecosystem,” meaning customers, employees and partners. In other words, you need to build a community.


.@Marketo’s recipe for growth? Acquire customers, grow lifetime value, build brand advocates

 

Click To Tweet

 


Part of this comes down to great customer support. Patrick Llewellyn, CEO of Australian design marketplace 99designs, said that establishing a customer support center in San Francisco early on was one of the keys to the company’s remarkable growth; customers would actually call them up just to validate that they were legit.

Another big piece of the puzzle is partnerships. Bastian Lehmann, CEO of online food delivery service Postmates, talked about building a “three-sided marketplace” that has allowed his company to monetize through three different streams:

  • Customers, who pay a delivery fee
  • Couriers – Postmates has been able to negotiate competitive rates for things like insurance and gear that they resell to delivery staff
  • Merchants – now that they have scale (and leverage), they can ask businesses, who they previously ignored, for a cut

Likewise, companies like Uber, PayPal and Dropbox have thrived off of old school referral programs. HootSuite’s Holmes boasted that partners have made hundreds of thousands of dollars off their ecosystem.

Bottom line: Give people a reason to love you and an incentive to spread that love and your boss (or investors or heirs) will love you too.

Mobile is kind of a big deal

Markus Frind, the plainspoken PlentyOfFish CEO, said something else that took the audience’s breath away at the very end of the day. He said that 90% of his site’s traffic is now mobile, which has led him to question whether they even need to support a desktop website anymore (!).

That’s a staggering statement from a tech founder. And he wasn’t the only one who emphasized just how important mobile has become as a lever for growth.


90% of @PlentyofFish’s traffic is mobile. Their CEO questions whether they even need a desktop site.

 

Click To Tweet

 


Sameer Dholakia, CEO of email delivery service SendGrid, pointed out that savvy marketers want to be able to run their campaigns across all channels.

Since your mobile users are the same people as your desktop users, you want to make sure the experience you’re giving them on mobile is complementary. It should reinforce the goals of the larger campaign while catering to their needs and intentions at that particular moment, on whatever device they’re using.

The trick is to make the lives of mobile users as easy possible. That means reducing the amount of friction between them and your conversion goal. As Dinkar Jain, Senior Product Manager at Twitter put it, “mobile users rarely want to do anything fancy.”

Alexander Peh, Head of Mobile at PayPal Canada, pointed out that something as simple as entering an email and password on a mobile device can be a “pain in the ass” because you’re forced to keep switching between numbers, letters and symbols on a tiny keyboard. Peh said that when they replaced the email and password requirement with a phone number and 4-digit pin on mobile, usage skyrocketed.


Don’t trouble mobile users. When @PayPal replaced email login with phone# login, usage skyrocketed.

 

Click To Tweet

 


For more detailed advice on how to optimize your pages and campaigns for mobile users, check out this handy article.

More learnings

The day was packed with too many awesome tips and insights to squeeze into this article (that and I’m getting hungry) so why don’t I just let you peer into my notebook yourself? You can find my unabridged TractionConf notes right here.

But since there’s nothing like a real life event, you should join us at the Call to Action conference in September. It’s also in Vancouver and you’ll learn a ridiculous amount about conversion rate optimization, A/B testing, copywriting, landing page design and – maybe, just maybe – a new growth hack or two. See you there!


Growth Lessons from Twitter, HubSpot, PayPal and PlentyOfFish

A Love Affair: Social Data & Strategy

Less than a decade ago, data merely functioned as a way to track operations or forecast needs. However, today, we collect data to learn about every single interaction of our potential customers. We even invest in new technology just to gain insight about how people learn about our products and services.

Big data is big business. Wikibon projects that the big data market will top $84 billion in 2026.

Image1_Wikibon

Source: Wikibon’s Big Data Market Forecast

An intense bond exists between social data and strategy. Social data determines how your company designs a system to influence consumers. With a plan anchored in analytics, you have the chance to tailor to your customers’ needs and offer top dollar for your services.

Be proactive by integrating social data into your business’s overall plan. Focus on the following four areas:

1. Establish Brand Credibility

Use social data to start a conversation about your brand. From tracking hashtags to monitoring posts, gather intel from positive and negative feedback. Then, build a marketing campaign to engage consumers with your mission and values.

In a September 2014 survey, the Pew Research Center found that 52% percent of online adults reported using two or more social media sites. This is a significant increase from 42% in 2013.

Online conversations are occurring in several places. Focus on two to three social media channels, like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Hashtags play a major role in driving viral content. They can help spread your brand’s message, track industry-related headlines, and analyze the tone of customer discussions.

Consider creating your own brand hashtag. It can be your company’s name or tagline. If your business name is generic, develop a unique hashtag. Keep it short and easy to spell.

KitKat uses its tagline as a brand hashtag: #HaveABreak. On Instagram, KitKat fanatics share photos of how they indulge with the product. Here’s an example:

Image2_KitKatInstagram

Source: KitKat’s #HAVEABREAK

On Twitter, KitKat communicates directly with customers in a fun-loving manner. See below.

Image3_KitKatTwitter

Source: @KitKat

Depending on your marketing team’s capacity, closely oversee your brand. Steer clear from outsourcing your brand monitoring. Value remains in performing it in-house. Your team members are the most qualified to handle the brand. Moreover, you want your voice to be authentic when talking with customers.

Key Takeaway: Establish brand credibility with a hashtag on multiple social media channels.

2. Create Meaningful Content

Content is only king if it benefits your bottom line. Learn what keywords and phrases resonate with buyers. Crowdsource ideas to produce content that matters to the user. All your content–website, brochures, and tweets–should be a reflection of your consumer.

Data mining for editorial content is common for companies. In 2014, the OKCupid blog highlighted the link between race and attraction. This actionable data helped improve its matchmaking algorithm, while providing attractive content for its audience.

To create great content, figure out what type of content already exists. For example, if you want to compose a blog post about SasS marketing, look for all articles that include the words “SaaS” and “marketing” near each other. A simple search query with Boolean operators will work. Try this: ++“SaaS” NEAR/4 marketing.

Image4_GoogleSearch

Source: Google Search

Also, use these other boolean operators.

Image5_BooleanOperators

Source: Boolean Operators

Improved content creation begins with access to this kind of data. It accelerates more targeted and informed topics to interested readers. In return, you get increased audience engagement and more traffic to your website.

Social data intelligence holds valuable information about how your brand and content is perceived. Executives seek technology that is scalable, measurable, and cost-effective. Take advantage of this opportunity.

Create a content strategy based on the data. By filtering through Twitter and Facebook feeds, observe the top performing tweets and adjust your messaging accordingly.

Image6_ArbysTweet

Source: Arby’s Grammy Tweet

Here’s a good example of Arby’s executing real-time meaningful content, “while also allowing data and clear audience analysis to show where and when it would be appropriate to enter an online conversation.”

Key Takeaway: Create meaningful content by data mining.

3. Gain Competitor Insight

Analyze your competitors’ efforts and compare their key performance metrics to your own. Then, optimize your plans for success.

Decide who are your competitors. They should be grouped as any of the following:

  • Your direct competitors;
  • Companies with similar audience, but in a different sector; and
  • Businesses with a comparable content strategy, but for a different audience.

Social media moves quickly. More than 40% of consumers expect their online requests to be answered within an hour.

Measure your responsiveness against other market leaders. You might not control the industry standards, but you must attain them to retain customers and grow your business. By analyzing how your brand ranks within your field, you can set realistic goals for your social media engagement.

Airline delays are common forms of customer frustration. People usually vent about their airplane woes. To ensure customer loyalty, JetBlue Airways is responsive to their customers via Twitter.

Image7_JetBlueTweet

Source: @JetBlue

Ready to spy? Learning what keywords your competition deems valuable can be helpful. SpyFu and iSpionage are two tools that help automate this process. Enter a keyword or domain, and then discover which keywords your competitors bid on.

Here’s how to find popular keywords amongst your competitors on SpyFu Kombat:

  1. Enter the domains of your three competitors.

Image8_KombatSearchBar

  1. Click the overlap of all three competitors’ keyword circles.

Image9_KombatOverlap

  1. The results are filtered by popular keywords amongst your competitors.

Image10_KombatResults

Source: SpyFu Kombat Tutorial

Learn how competitors are differentiating themselves in the marketplace. What drives consumers toward and away from your competitors? Study the competition’s data to learn and grow from their pitfalls.

Key Takeaway: Gain competitor insight by examining your industry leaders’ keywords and customer responsiveness.

4. Find New Sources of Revenue

Social data can be effective in increasing sales if implemented as a focal point for customer service. Demonstrate the reliability and trustworthiness of your business by engaging consumers.

According to the Sales 2.0 Conference, “70 percent of a customer’s buying decision is now made based on information he or she finds online, well before a salesperson has a chance to get involved.” This disconnection lessens the influence of sales reps with buyers.

Help your salespeople get ahead of the trends. Empower your social media team to interact with consumers. Retweet their announcements and congratulate customers on key victories.

Image11_StarbucksTwitter

Source: How to Do Sales on Twitter

Chief marketing officers are under pressure to deliver above-market growth. According to a study, 72 percent of CEOs stated “that marketers are constantly asking for more funding but can hardly explain how much incremental business this funding will generate.” This is an opportunity for marketing professionals to effectively employ the use of big data.

Kohl’s encouraged its customers to shop with a simple call to action on Facebook. The brand didn’t try to trick people or emotionally persuade folks. And it paid off! In four days, Kohl’s got more than 30,000 people to claim a promotional offer.

Image12_KohlsFacebook

Source: Kohl’s Keeps It Pithy on Facebook

Social media serves as an important touch point for business development success. Nowadays, emails and voicemails go unresponded. Make an effort to follow up with prospects via social media.

Key Takeaway: Find new sources of revenue by engaging customers honestly and directly.

Share Your Story

Social data and strategy are the perfect pair. It’s quite hard to imagine one without the other. Plan with data in mind and your business will benefit from more brand awareness, engagement, and revenue.

How are you implementing social data into your business strategy? What’s working (or not working)? Share your story in the comments below.

About the Author: Shayla Price lives at the intersection of digital marketing, the law and social responsibility. She inspires a new breed of innovative attorneys at Hearsay Marketing. Connect with her on Twitter: @shaylaprice

A Love Affair: Social Data & Strategy

Growth Lessons from Twitter, HubSpot, PayPal and PlentyOfFish

Some call it – *cough* – growth hacking. Others call it optimization. But what we’re all talking about, really, is crazy smart, innovative, results-driven, product-focused marketing that has an outsized impact on your company’s growth and bottom line.

1379943011_598292216
Amirite?

In certain circles, the term of art is traction. Traction is what separates fledgling startups from international brands and it’s the name of a one-day, one-track event that brought dozens of founders and growth champions from tech giants like Twitter, LinkedIn, Dropbox, Hootsuite, Marketo, HubSpot and PlentyofFish to Vancouver last month.

The day was filled with actionable insights and examples of how small tests, tweaks and tactics can make or break your business. Here are some of our key takeaways.

Product comes first

In many companies, product and marketing are viewed and operated as distinct departments. But one of the prevalent themes of the day was that your product is actually your most important marketing asset.

Indeed, Markus Frind, founder and CEO of dating site PlentyofFish made the crowd gasp when he said that by the time he hired his first employee (and started to build out his marketing team), he already had a hit product with 15 million users and $10 million in revenue!

Neil Patel, co-founder of KissMetrics and CrazyEgg, pointed out that conversion optimization is actually a lot like dating; you need to give people a chance to get to know you before you ask for their hand in marriage. He suggested letting potential customers play around with your product before they have to sign up.

Selina Tobaccowala, President & CTO of SurveyMonkey, said something similar:

The more you can get people using features of the product before they have to upgrade, the better for conversions.

But Tobaccowala also cautioned against pulling the old bait and switch. If you put a paid feature in people’s hands, let them know the price tag before they spend time with something they can’t afford.

Ryan Holmes, the founder and CEO of social relationship platform Hootsuite, insisted that the only reason Hootsuite outlasted or surpassed early competitors like Seesmic and TweetDeck is that it invested in product rather than advertising and PR.

Now that they’re the industry leader, HootSuite has built its marketing around the product – and the role it plays in people’s lives. Here’s how Holmes sees his role:

As CEO or founder your job is tell the story of your product and get people excited about it.

Find the metric that matters

If there’s anything that distinguishes growth-minded marketers it’s a steadfast belief in the power of numbers. As Aaron Ginn, Head of Growth at online retailer Everlane (and formerly of StumbleUpon) put it, a growth hacker is:

Someone who emphasizes data over opinions.

We know that data is big these days (especially “big data”) but that’s precisely the problem: Data is big. There’s a ton of it. And it can be intimidating and unwieldy.

That’s why, before staring into the abyss of analytics, you need to identify the metrics that really matter to your business.

Dinesh Thiru, VP Marketing at online education marketplace Udemy, said that his two main metrics are revenue and student happiness. While user growth is also important, Udemy learned that you have to look at both the quantity and quality of users you’re acquiring. Some users “monetize better than others” and so focusing on actual purchases helps keep Udemy honest.

In terms of tracking student happiness, Thiru said he looks at Udemy’s Net Promoter Score (NPS), which measures how likely users are to recommend the company to friends or colleagues. Interestingly, Thiru found that users who reported a higher NPS also had a higher lifetime value. In this way, Udemy’s two key metrics reinforce each other nicely.


.@Udemy discovered that their most valuable customers were also their happiest ones.

 

Click To Tweet

 


Allen Lau, the founder and CEO of online writing community Wattpad, said that at his company’s primary metric is monthly active users. This is something Wattpad’s investors insisted the company focus on instead of making money. That said, more recently Wattpad has begun to zero in on advertising as its core business model and so the monthly users metrics now seems less like a vanity metric and more revenue-oriented after all.

Retention is not an afterthought

If you have poor retention, nothing else matters.

That’s a quote from Brian Balfour, VP Growth at HubSpot. It may seem dramatic, but we’ve all heard the adage that it’s easier to market to existing customers than new ones and without retention, traction just isn’t possible.

Balfour enumerated a few reasons retention is so important:

  • As you increase retention, you increase lifetime value and can afford a higher cost per acquisition (CPA) – allowing you to spend more at the top of the funnel
  • As you increase retention, you increase virality (your longtime customers become advocates on your behalf) and eventually decrease CPA
  • As you increase retention, you increase upgrade rates and decrease payback periods (meaning more money in the bank)

The key to retention in the first week after sign-up, according to Balfour, is to get users to experience your core value as quickly as possible through better onboarding, clearer messaging and tailoring the user experience to new customers.

improving-31-retention
 

For example, HubSpot was looking to increase adoption of its new email tool, Sidekick. The first step was to understand why users were churning in the first week. A majority of people reported that they just didn’t understand the product or have time to figure it out.

some-of-our-findings
 

By separating the new user experience from the core application, encouraging users to sign up with their work email addresses (where they were more likely to see the product’s value) and improving their educational content, they were able to significantly reduce churn.

It takes a community

Retention, of course, isn’t just about great user experience or clever email marketing. The key to keeping your customers for the long haul is to empower them to become more than customers.

Here’s the recipe for sustainable growth that Phil Fernandez, Marketo’s CEO, shared:

  1. Acquire new customers
  2. Grow lifetime value
  3. Build brand advocates
fundamental-recipe-for-growth
 

Fernandez said businesses need to think about how they’re creating a “shared purpose” with everyone in their “ecosystem,” meaning customers, employees and partners. In other words, you need to build a community.


.@Marketo’s recipe for growth? Acquire customers, grow lifetime value, build brand advocates

 

Click To Tweet

 


Part of this comes down to great customer support. Patrick Llewellyn, CEO of Australian design marketplace 99designs, said that establishing a customer support center in San Francisco early on was one of the keys to the company’s remarkable growth; customers would actually call them up just to validate that they were legit.

Another big piece of the puzzle is partnerships. Bastian Lehmann, CEO of online food delivery service Postmates, talked about building a “three-sided marketplace” that has allowed his company to monetize through three different streams:

  • Customers, who pay a delivery fee
  • Couriers – Postmates has been able to negotiate competitive rates for things like insurance and gear that they resell to delivery staff
  • Merchants – now that they have scale (and leverage), they can ask businesses, who they previously ignored, for a cut

Likewise, companies like Uber, PayPal and Dropbox have thrived off of old school referral programs. HootSuite’s Holmes boasted that partners have made hundreds of thousands of dollars off their ecosystem.

Bottom line: Give people a reason to love you and an incentive to spread that love and your boss (or investors or heirs) will love you too.

Mobile is kind of a big deal

Markus Frind, the plainspoken PlentyOfFish CEO, said something else that took the audience’s breath away at the very end of the day. He said that 90% of his site’s traffic is now mobile, which has led him to question whether they even need to support a desktop website anymore (!).

That’s a staggering statement from a tech founder. And he wasn’t the only one who emphasized just how important mobile has become as a lever for growth.


90% of @PlentyofFish’s traffic is mobile. Their CEO questions whether they even need a desktop site.

 

Click To Tweet

 


Sameer Dholakia, CEO of email delivery service SendGrid, pointed out that savvy marketers want to be able to run their campaigns across all channels.

Since your mobile users are the same people as your desktop users, you want to make sure the experience you’re giving them on mobile is complementary. It should reinforce the goals of the larger campaign while catering to their needs and intentions at that particular moment, on whatever device they’re using.

The trick is to make the lives of mobile users as easy possible. That means reducing the amount of friction between them and your conversion goal. As Dinkar Jain, Senior Product Manager at Twitter put it, “mobile users rarely want to do anything fancy.”

Alexander Peh, Head of Mobile at PayPal Canada, pointed out that something as simple as entering an email and password on a mobile device can be a “pain in the ass” because you’re forced to keep switching between numbers, letters and symbols on a tiny keyboard. Peh said that when they replaced the email and password requirement with a phone number and 4-digit pin on mobile, usage skyrocketed.


Don’t trouble mobile users. When @PayPal replaced email login with phone# login, usage skyrocketed.

 

Click To Tweet

 


For more detailed advice on how to optimize your pages and campaigns for mobile users, check out this handy article.

More learnings

The day was packed with too many awesome tips and insights to squeeze into this article (that and I’m getting hungry) so why don’t I just let you peer into my notebook yourself? You can find my unabridged TractionConf notes right here.

But since there’s nothing like a real life event, you should join us at the Call to Action conference in September. It’s also in Vancouver and you’ll learn a ridiculous amount about conversion rate optimization, A/B testing, copywriting, landing page design and – maybe, just maybe – a new growth hack or two. See you there!


Growth Lessons from Twitter, HubSpot, PayPal and PlentyOfFish

Using Solar Power in Your Home

 

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Residential solar power is becoming an attractive option for many people. They can use the sun’s energy to operate various devices and to heat their homes. It is also earth-friendly and economical way to bring the power in your home. Solar energy can help reduce external energy consumption by 50-70 percent. There are several different ways you can use solar energy in your home, which may include the use of solar panels and solar thermal systems to produce electricity.

Once you have installed solar power in your home, you can use water heated by solar energy to produce hot water and heat your home. There will be a collector mounted on an elevated area, such as the roof, and is used to absorb thermal energy from the sun. Often increases the heat and stores the resulting hot water. This heat can be piped through radiators to heat the house and provide hot water. Besides reducing your electricity bills, it can add value to your home if you decide to sell your home.

The main reason why many people are using residential solar power is helping to reduce the cost of their utility bills. Depending on the type of solar system used in a dozen years, the solar panels can pay for themselves. The Department of Energy United States hopes that by 2020, solar energy will become common place in homes. They also expect to see the normal cut energy consumption by seventy percent in that time.

The solar electric panel is the technology used in solar power, which uses photons to produce electricity. Solar electric panels, known as photovoltaic panels (PV) can be installed in a variety of ways, such as:

• Free standing rigid sheets

 

• Adjust your ceiling

 

• peel and stick laminate

 

How dependent are installed ceiling. The captured energy is converted into electricity through a modified grid system. It has an installed meter that reads the amount of solar energy used in your home compared to normal electricity used. The meter will then subtract the power of solar energy is used and what is left is then applied to your electric bill.

Most solar energy systems that are used are also able to store some of the energy they generate so if there is a surplus of energy can be used at a later time. Besides using the stored energy to generate rooms hot water and heat, it can also supply for other electronic equipment and light your home. The main cost of solar energy is the cost of installing the system and solar panels.

Using Solar Power in Your Home

4 Ways You’re Using UTM Tags Wrong

The only way for us marketers to run more successful campaigns is to track what works and what doesn’t. Without proper tracking in place, we’re basically driving with our hands over our eyes, hoping it’ll all work out.

blindtest-650
Yeah, not the brightest idea. Image source.

One of the ways that marketers track the success of their campaigns is with UTM tags, which allow you to append a unique string to your URL so you can track the traffic that a particular source sends to your page.

They make your links look a little something like this:

Sounds pretty basic, right? Well it is, for the most part.

Except for when you’re using your UTM tags incorrectly or — even worse — not at all. When this happens, you can’t track traffic from each referral source and most importantly, you can’t keep tabs on what’s working and what’s not.

Which means you’re not likely to improve your campaigns and conversion rates.

But before we go into what not to do with your UTM codes, let’s start off with the basics of what you should be doing.

How to create a UTM tag

You can build UTM tags through Google’s free URL builder.

It’s a super simple form that’s easy to fill in once you’ve got a landing page URL and some basic information about your campaign.

create-a-utm-tag
 

All you need to do is:

  • Paste your campaign landing page URL under “Website URL.”
  • Choose a source. This is the referral origin, which is typically the site, platform or search engine people are coming from (for example: Google, Twitter, blog, etc).
  • Choose a medium. This is the generator of the traffic, such as a particular ad, image or piece of content (for example: cost-per-click, email, social, banner, etc).
  • Choose a name. This name is for your own internal tracking purposes and so each campaign has a unique identifier (for example: promo code, product launch, sale, etc).

“Campaign Term” and “Campaign Content” are optional fields which allow you to include additional information (read about how to use those here).

Once you plug in this information, Google will generate your UTM link and you can copy/paste it for use in your emails, blog posts, social and any other method of distribution you’re using to spread the word about your campaign.

UTM_example
An example UTM code which shows how Website URL, Campaign Source, Campaign Medium, and Campaign Name appear.

Alternatively, you can use this free UTM builder than can be installed directly in Chrome, which saves you at least one step when you’re building out UTM tags.

utm-builder-chrome-extension
 

Okay, now that you know what to do, let’s jump into what not to do – here are four common ways people fail at using UTM codes.

1. Not keeping tabs on the performance of each distribution channel

When you run a marketing campaign, you’re likely going to promote it through multiple channels: paid advertising, email, social media, your blog and whatever else you can dream up.

Let’s say you’re launching a new feature and you want to promote a landing page that flaunts it. You might want to send a blast out to your email list, social channels, and maybe even guest post on someone else’s blog to spread the word to a different audience.

If you neglect to append a unique UTM on the link you’re placing on each channel, then how will you know which channel is driving traffic to your post?

The answer is you won’t.

And you’ll likely miss out on some key insights down the road, such as which source of traffic and which campaign is sending the most qualified leads to your page.

For every channel, be sure that you’re keeping tabs on each referral source for every campaign. And use unique naming conventions so that you don’t get any wires crossed.

2. Neglecting to use link shorteners

Getting specific with the data you track is great, but there are things you have to watch out for. When you append a UTM tag to a URL, that URL becomes really long and bulky. Like this one, for example:

As you can imagine, this isn’t conducive to a good user experience. Your links can look a little unwieldy in campaign emails and on social media, and they can even come across as spammy – which is why you should always use link shorteners to clean up those ugly links.

Use services like bit.ly or Google URL shortener, or simply hide the ugly UTM code by linking to it from cleaner-looking anchor text.

3. Tracking clicks but not conversions

Assuming you have Google Analytics set up, you’ll be able to see the performance of your URLs with unique UTM tags by going to Campaigns > All Campaigns.

While tracking referral traffic from your UTM tags is incredibly helpful, you should go a step further and create Google Analytics goals so you can see which referral traffic converts the best as well.

If you’ve never set up a goal in Google Analytics, it’s a simple process:

  1. Sign in to your Google Analytics account.
  2. Select the “Admin” tab and navigate to the desired account, property and view.
  3. In the “View” column, click “Goals.”
  4. Click the red “+NEW GOAL” button.
new-goal-small
Click for larger image.
  1. Next, you’ll want to follow the instructions of the “Goal setup” wizard, depending on what kind of conversion you’re looking for. For example, if you were collecting leads on a lead gen page, you might set the goal as “Engagement” > “Sign up.”
goal-google-analytics-650
Click for larger image.

Setting up goals in GA allows you to look beyond which channel is driving the most traffic – and it gives you insight into which channel is actually converting best.

If it’s AdWords, then you know you can up your spend and focus on conversions to get the most lift. If it’s email, then you know to double-down on building your email list and focus more converting those subscribers.

4. Creating meaningless UTM campaign terms

When you’re building your UTM tag, it’s important to remember that you’re doing so because you want to be able to track each individual campaign and sources easily. So, if you name each campaign something weird, such as “f3356” you’re going to end up mixing campaigns up and wasting time decoding your campaign terms.

Do yourself a favor and only write short, descriptive campaign terms such as “04_15_newsletter” or “summer_15_promo.”

For example, take a look at this CTA from a Jackthreads’ email newsletter:

jackthreads-newsletter-utm
 

When you click-through on this image, this is the UTM:

https://www.jackthreads.com/?utm_source=members&utm_medium=email&utm_content=main_sale_img&utm_term

 

=sale&utm_campaign=JT_MainSale_05072015_Thursday%20Noon_%5BEngaged

 

%20B%5D&tmem=bpindulic%40gmail.com

They are very descriptive here. They cite the source (members – meaning their active members group), campaign term (sale – as in a promotional sale), the time and date the email went out, and even the email of the person who clicked through!

Each one of these assets can be found directly in the UTM link – and you can get the same level of detail out of each of your campaigns if you take the time to create detailed and data-rich UTM links.

Wrapping up

As data-driven marketers, we’re constantly looking for ways to improve our campaigns.

When you have the tools to track referrals, you get insight into which channels are bringing you the most traffic. Better yet, when you combine UTM links with Google Analytics goals, you can look deep down into your funnel and determine which sources are bringing you the most conversions.

It’s all pretty straightforward – as long as you’re doing it right.

4 Ways You’re Using UTM Tags Wrong